Is the label verified?
Yes
Is the meaning of the label consistent?
Yes
Are the label standards publicly available?
Yes
Is information about the organization publicly available?
Yes
Is the organization free from conflict of interest?
Yes
Was the label developed with broad public and industry input?
Yes

This label can be found onMeat, fruit, vegetables, legumes, and grains

www.agriculturaljusticeproject.org/en/learn-more/?pane=purchase

ORGANIZATION: Agricultural Justice Project

url: www.agriculturaljusticeproject.org

LABEL STANDARDSwww.agriculturaljusticeproject.org/en/learn-more/?pane=standards

 

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What this label means 

How meaningful is this label? 

Highly meaningful.

The Food Justice Certified label assures consumers that they are supporting farmers who are earning a living wage and supporting farms and businesses that treat their workers fairly.

Fair prices and living wages are clearly defined and required. Unlike some other fair trade labels that only vaguely define “living wages,” Food Justice Certified standards define living wages as the net wage earned during a country’s legal maximum workweek, but not more than 40 hours. This living wage provides for the needs of an average family unit (including nutrition, clothing, health care, education, potable water, child care, transportation, housing, and energy), plus savings (10 percent of income).

Farmworkers also receive workers compensation, disability, and unemployment coverage, social security, sick leave (unpaid at least), and maternity or paternity leave. The standards require rest days (one day of rest for every seven days worked) and ensure that any work in addition to a 48-hour workweek is voluntary (extra overtime pay is not a minimum requirement but a goal of continual improvement).

The label is unique among fair trade and social responsibility labels because standards cover workers along the entire supply chain, from the farm where the food is grown to the companies that process and market the foods, to the retailers that sell it.

The label sets a high bar because it covers all workers, including migrant workers and seasonal workers, on all farms, regardless of size.

Food Justice Certified is one of the few labels that do not allow “split operations” (which produce both certified and noncertified products). A farm, company, or retailer has to be entirely certified before any of its products can bear the label.

The environmental responsibility component of the standards is also strong. At this time, only certified organic farms can carry the Food Justice Certified label. It is one of the only fair trade/social responsibility labels that prohibits the cultivation of genetically engineered (GMO) crops on the farm and the presence of GMOs in the final product bearing the label.

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Is the label verified?
Is the meaning of the label consistent?
Are the label standards publicly available?
Is information about the organization publicly available?
Is the organization free from conflict of interest?
Was the label developed with broad public and industry input?