Is the label verified?

Yes

Is the meaning of the label consistent?

Partially

Are the label standards publicly available?

Yes

Is information about the organization publicly available?

Yes

Is the organization free from conflict of interest?

Unknown

Was the label developed with broad public and industry input?

Yes

This label can be found on: Beef, chicken, pork, turkey, sheep, goat, bison

ORGANIZATION: Global Animal Partnership

url: http://www.globalanimalpartnership.org

LABEL STANDARDShttp://www.globalanimalpartnership.org/5-step-animal-welfare-rating-program/standards

 

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What this label means

The label means that the animals were raised on farms that were verified to meet the farm animal welfare standards of Global Animal Partnership, a non-profit organization that says it “promotes and facilitates continuous improvement in animal agriculture, encourages animal welfare friendly farming practices, and informs consumers about the animal farming systems they choose to support.”

The Global Animal Partnership program uses six tiers, or steps, that each represent a different set of standards for how animals are raised on the farm. The step level that is achieved is indicated on the label. Step 1 is the lowest rating and Step 5+ is the highest rating. Higher step levels signify that higher standards of animal welfare were met.

For Step 1, the claim on the label is “no cages, no crates, no crowding.”

In our analysis, we found that Step 1 standards accommodate farms that confine pigs and chickens indoors and do not provide materials to allow the animals to engage in natural behaviors. The indoor space requirements only slightly exceed the industry norm. For beef, Step 1 reflects the industry norm of raising beef cattle on range or pasture for the first part of the animal’s life and then on a feedlot for the last portion of the animal’s life.

There are some benefits to Step 1 certification; for example, the standards for all step levels set limits on indoor ammonia levels, prohibit routine drug use, prohibit animal waste products in feed, and prohibit routine tail docking of pigs.

Below, we take a closer look at some of the requirements in the standards, for some of the species that can be certified (chicken, pork and beef).

Note that this summary does not cover all the requirements in the standards; to read the standards in their entirety, click on the link to the standards (above).

 

A closer look at the standards for broilers (chicken) 

Indoor space per bird
Clean litter
Indoor air / Ammonia levels
Lighting
Indoor environmental enrichment
Outdoor access
Genetics and better breeds / limit on fast growth
Slaughter

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A closer look at the standards for pigs (pork)

Indoor space per growing pig
Crates for gestating and farrowing sows
Clean bedding
Indoor air / ammonia levels
Indoor environmental enrichment
Outdoor access
Physical alterations
Blunt force trauma
Slaughter

A closer look at the standards for cattle (beef)

Pasture
Conditions in the feedlots
Pain relief during castration
Hot iron branding

Disbudding
Slaughter

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A closer look at the standards for: 

Antibiotic use
Drugs for growth promotion
Animal by-products in feed
GMOs in feed

How meaningful is this label? 

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Is the label verified?
Is the meaning of the label consistent?
Are the label standards publicly available?
Is information about the organization publicly available?
Is the organization free from conflict of interest?
Was the label developed with broad public and industry input?